5 Ways To Easily Turn A Bad Day Around

Welcome to Week 4 of the ‘March is for Me’ series. A series bringing you 5 blog posts across each Wednesday of the month. The aim is to spend an entire month focusing on ourselves with self-love, self-care and positivity. Today’s post is brought to you by Emily from Planning With Em, with 5 Ways to Easily Turn a Bad Day Around.

Photo by Hybrid on Unsplash

Bad days suck, there’s no doubt about that, but here are some tips on how to turn a bad day around. Whether something bad has happened to make your day bad or you just woke up on the wrong side of the bed, bad days aren’t fun. However, I do stand by the quote “it’s a bad day, not a bad life” and believe you can turn any bad day around. 

‘I’ve struggled with depression for over 6 years, so I have had plenty of bad days in my time. Whilst I am doing much better mentally right now, I still have days when depression hits me hard. I wanted to share how I turn a bad day around on these days.’

Thank you to Emily for giving me the opportunity to write this post for her blog, I hope it will help anyone who is having a hard time or perhaps in a bit of a funk! 

Pause, Reflect, Accept 

Before I even try to combat a bad day with some of the things listed below, I think it’s really important to go through the process of pausing, reflecting and accepting. 

Take a moment to pause, maybe meditate if you like, and think about what you’re actually feeling. Are you feeling sad, anxious, angry? It’s important to take note of what you’re feeling so you can reflect on why you might be feeling this way and accept it. 

I know from experience that when you’re depressed, there doesn’t have to be a reason why you feel bad, you just do. But I do find that when I’m having a bad day, something has usually triggered it and I can identify at least one emotion that I’m feeling. 

It’s important to accept how you are feeling and not beat yourself up about it. If you can, take the day off from your usual activities, look after yourself and let’s turn this bad day around. 

Do Something That Makes You Happy

Okay before you click off the post because this one is so obvious, think about the last time you did something that made you happy. Like truly made you happy? I bet it’s been too long. 

Take some time to do something that makes you really happy. This can be literally anything (as long as it doesn’t harm you or anyone else obviously). For me, I love to paint, watch youtube/netflix and read. I don’t get much time to do this during the week normally so they’re my go to activities for when I’m having a bad day.

Turn Off Your Phone

When I’m having a bad day, I try to stay away from social media because it can perpetuate bad feelings. For me especially, doom scrolling on twitter can be really bad for my mental health. 

I like to have a social media detox regularly and if you want to know how my last one went, here’s a blog post about my week long social media detox! If you find social media makes you feel worse, have a day off of it!

Photo by Aki Tolentino on Unsplash

Clean Your Environment

They say, “clean environment, clean mind” and I wholeheartedly agree. I cannot stand having an untidy/unclean environment, it stresses me out so much! I understand that if you’re having a bad day, it can be hard to motivate yourself to get out of bed, let alone clean. But for me, cleaning my room is an essential part of my self care because it helps me feel better! 

If your room looks like a bomb hit it, then why not set a timer and take 10 minutes to tidy up and clean? You’ll be amazed how much you can get done in this time and you might even want to carry on once the time goes off!

Random Act Of Kindness

I don’t know about you, but doing something nice for others makes me feel so much better! I love helping others so it’s something I try to do regularly.

If you’re having a bad day, why not do a random act of kindness? For example, you could write someone you love a letter, support a small business or maybe even buy a stranger a coffee! 

That wraps up my 5 ways to turn a bad day around, I hope you found them helpful. Please remember that you are not alone and if you need help, reach out to someone you trust and talk to them. Things will get better and this too shall pass. 


Thank you so much to Emily for sharing this wonderful post for the March is For Me series, I have loved each instalment so far and hope you have too. In a world where you can be anything, why not be kind! Stay tuned for the last post in this series next Wednesday!

Until next time,

Emily x

My Experience with Meditation

Welcome to Week 2 of the ‘March is for Me’ series. A series bringing you 5 blog posts across each Wednesday of the month. The aim is to spend an entire month focusing on ourselves with self-love, self-care and positivity. Today’s post is brought to you by Kimberly Redway from  Cultivate Your Quirk as she shares her experience with meditation. Click here for Part 1 with ‘Ways to Help Your Physical Health During the Day’.

Photo by Hans Vivek on Unsplash

“I had begun visiting a yoga studio for weekly sessions and then…. lockdown happened. The desire to tap into whatever inner calm I possessed, had grown stronger after having started my new full-time job last year. While I loved the job, I was becoming more stressed and with stress came…comfort eating. It was once lockdown started again that I decided to attempt meditation.”

There are said to be many benefits for the practice of meditation, but what I was interested in was stress relief, better self-awareness and also learning how to be more mindful. I wanted to re-ignite my ability to eat more mindfully, to concentrate on the food and to focus on what I want to take in.

 I found that meditation is about checking in with my body as I use an app called Headspace. I have learnt to think of it, not just as a vessel for the mind but to think of the connection between the two. As you know, one cannot survive without the other. I needed time to recharge and re-set. The meditation provided a space for that. My setting is my bedroom which is a small space, but you don’t need a series of tools to gain access to this exercise. 

More than just experiencing more calm and better self-awareness, I feel I have learnt more about my own identity.  I find myself considering who I am in the present rather than who I used to be or who I might become. I am learning to separate self-deprecating thoughts every day.

Photo by Lesly Juarez on Unsplash

I am not always the thoughts, I think. I have always been a daydreamer and it takes practice to remain in the moment. I am considering that identity. Mediation has an impact beyond when I am sitting with my eyes closed. What I do in my bedroom with my back against the wall and eyes closed is like ripples through my everyday life. Change is coming from these single moments

My eating experience has improved but there is a way to go. I understand that for long term results- time must be taken. It is enough to gain knowledge of myself and to also praise my ability to be still. It is not about berating yourself for being inexperienced, but celebrating your access to the mind you hold dear. 

So, I sit in my room, listening to the soothing tone of the voice from the speaker of my phone. I become aware of my surroundings before closing my eyes and allowing it to sweep over me.


Thank you to Kimberly for sharing her meditation journey for this series. It is always a breath of fresh air to hear personal accounts so I am grateful to share this with you. Stay tuned next Wednesday for the 3rd installment of ‘March is For Me’.

Until next time,

Emily x

What is the ‘5 year plan’ and should you have one?

The notorious ‘five-year plan‘ question may send you into a cold sweat or be the easiest question you could answer. You may have first been asked this question during your final years in education or at a job interview. This is the question that would fill me with instant dread and pressure; are you really meant to know? Are you meant to be aiming for something in particular in 5 years? Do I just fall victim to societal pressures and say “job, house, kids”?

I’d like to disclaim that I am not totally against a 2/5/10 year plan – I am sure it holds importance for many people that actually find it useful and motivating. However, what about those that don’t have a 5-year plan? Do you not hire those that don’t have a suitable enough timeline planned out? What is the significance of 5 years? Theoretically, it is not a long time in the grand scheme of things.

What is there to plan?

  • A change in mentality and perspective
  • Career progression, or even career break
  • Housing situation
  • Relationship status
  • Travel destinations
  • Personal achievements i.e. skydive or learning a language
  • Business adventure
  • Children

The list truly is endless. Personally, I view my life as being one complicated stencil I’ve drawn around on a piece of paper. There will be lines that I will want to perfect and make them as neat as possible, but there will be lines where my hand is shaky and I accidentally go outside of the lines. However, at the end of it, I will be mostly content with what I have created.

Life is renowned for being unpredictable. There are days when it may feel like a huge boulder has crashed down in the middle of your path, making it difficult to work around, but not impossible. Acknowledging that life will always have its curveballs, should help a life plan seem less intimidating. Things go wrong, but there will always be a way to get back on track and dust yourself off again. It is almost guaranteed, that if you were to ask anyone who is 5 years older than you, if they have got to where they are by sailing their way through life – they will most likely say no.

What are some pros and cons to having a 5-year plan?

Pros:

  • Gives you goals to work towards, no matter how big or small
  • Allows you to prioritise your goals in terms of when you want to achieve them
  • Can keep you disciplined and on track
  • Hand in hand with the above; can force you to start something you have been putting off
  • It can be comforting

Cons:

  • You may feel pressured and rushed
  • Your plan may adhere more to stereotypical achievements by default
  • May cause a feeling of disappointment if you don’t hit certain milestones within a certain period
  • It can make room for comparisons with other people’s success
  • You may become too attached to the plan and opposed to change

Photo by Marten Bjork on Unsplash

The logistics of a 5-year plan are so personal to each individual. What might be a mountain to one person, is a molehill for another. It can be exciting to share your plans with others – I don’t believe the intention of a plan is negative. If you are surrounded by decent people, you should hopefully never feel belittled by what you have set yourself, you should have nothing but support and encouragement.

Personally, I choose to live life day-by-day. I will happily write a to-do list in the morning and can stick to it pretty well. Stretch it further than a weekly plan, and I will probably struggle to stay on track. My interests and motivation levels fluctuate too regularly for a long-term plan to sit comfortably in my head. Knowing what I want out of life is important, but the route to get there can be as sporadic and spontaneous as possible.

So in terms of being asked “where do you see yourself in 5 years?” in a job interview, the intention behind the question is probably to cover their own backs. Is this person looking to be in a completely different position in a few years to what they’ve applied for? Can we afford to train someone who sounds like they are going to leave soon? I understand why the question is asked, but it can be a tough cookie to crack if you are not a natural planner.

To conclude

A 5-year plan is exactly what you make of it. It can be as intense or as mild as you like. There is no obligation to know the answer to this question, but I do feel like it crops up quite often. It offers food for thought in many different ways. Planning what I think is my ideal plan, can allow me to spot pitfalls and genuinely think carefully about the routes I wish to take.

Avid organisers may thrive by setting their goals long into the future, and to that, I say hats off. There is not a right or wrong answer. It is admirable to see how we all cope and work our way through this journey. If you are keen to know how to create your own 5-year plan, there are many resources available to help.

“If the plan doesn’t work, change the plan but never the goal”

What are your thoughts on the concept of a 5-year plan?

Until next time,

Emily x